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Is It Safe To Use A Weighted Blanket If You’re Pregnant?

Restful sleep can be hard to come by during pregnancy. Let's talk about how weighted blankets can help.

Is It Safe To Use A Weighted Blanket If You’re Pregnant?

Bearassentials

Many women experience changes in their sleep patterns during pregnancy.

Cozying up under a weighted blanket releases sleep-related and relaxation hormones, which can help reduce anxiety, insomnia, and restlessness in pregnant women.

Select a breathable weighted blanket if you're prone to night sweats, and stick to your pre-pregnancy weight when choosing your blanket weight.

Did you know?
Newborn babies sleep for up to 16 hours per day! On the other hand, new parents lose an average of 109 minutes every night during the first year of parenthood.

Many women find it more challenging to get good quality sleep as they progress in their pregnancy. The risks associated with taking medications or herbal infusions to improve your sleep while pregnant make these less viable options. So what is a mom-to-be to do? A natural sleep solution for many pregnant women is a weighted blanket.

What Is A Weighted Blanket?

Weighted blankets are a therapeutic tool that harnesses the benefits of deep touch pressure or DTP. Resting under a weighted blanket feels like a soothing, full-body hug and brings about the health benefits of lowered anxiety and improved sleep.

The gentle pressure that is evenly dispersed across your body as you rest underneath it signals the release of relaxation and sleep hormones. This natural chemical reaction helps your body feel calmer, so you can fall asleep faster and sleep deeper.

What Are The Benefits Of Using Weighted Blankets During Pregnancy?

Expectant mothers find it hard to sleep restfully as their pregnancy progresses. Weighted blankets can help ease several pregnancy-related sleep problems.

Relieves anxiety

While pregnancy is an exciting and wonderful time, it naturally comes with nervousness about the unknowns of childbirth and parenthood. Feeling a little anxious during pregnancy is not unusual but for some women anxiety can at times interfere with their sleep.

Curling up under a knitted weighted blanket is a simple and effective way to help combat anxiety during pregnancy. The evenly-distributed weight touches pressure points throughout the body and signals the release of serotonin, the happy hormone.

Spend a few minutes cocooned in a Napper, take a few deep breaths, and you’ll likely emerge feeling calmer and more relaxed.

Reduces insomnia

Besides feelings of anxiety, the physical and hormonal changes in the body can also lead to sleeplessness and, in some cases, more severe disorders. Weighted blankets are often used as a drug-free way to help treat sleep disorders such as insomnia.

Relieves Restless Legs Syndrome

Those same hormonal changes in your body during pregnancy can sometimes also cause what’s known as Restless Legs Syndrome or RLS. Many describe it as a tingling sensation creeping through the legs as you fall asleep. This particular condition is often associated with high levels of cortisol.

Cozying under a weighted blanket helps naturally lowers cortisol levels, reducing RLS severity.

pregnant woman with blanket

What Are The Risks Of Using A Weighted Blanket During Pregnancy?

While we always recommend consulting your health practitioner before you start using a weighted blanket during pregnancy, weighted blankets are generally considered safe for expectant mothers. When it comes to weighted blankets for babies or toddlers, it is not recommended to share your weighted blanket with your baby or small child.

So, how do you choose the best weighted blanket for a mom-to-be? Ideally, your weighted blanket should be around 10% of your body weight.

How To Choose A Weighted Blanket For Pregnant Women

Make sure to select a weighted blanket weight based on 10% of your body weight before you were pregnant – there’s no need to bump up to a heavier weight as your baby grows. If you’re concerned about overheating or night sweats, we recommend trying a cooling weighted blanket.

Apart from the right weight and type, consider your weighted blanket's sustainability features. Many weighted blankets use fillers made from plastic beads and synthetic fibers to get that added weight and potentially release microplastics that can harm your health.

Our sustainable weighted blankets are entirely artificial filler-free as we use layers of all-natural organic cotton to give our Cotton Nappers their heft. Our products are also MADE IN GREEN by OEKE-Tex certified, which means they are crafted in a way that is kind to you, our planet, and the people who make them. So you can rest easy knowing that you are taking care of your sleep health plus the health of the earth your child will be growing up in.

woman with coffee and blanket

More Tips For Getting Naturally Better Sleep While Pregnant

How else can you bolster sleep health during pregnancy? Here are a few tips for making sure you get your best rest while you’ve got a bun in the oven.

  • Try using a body pillow to help you get comfortable at night. Body pillows can help relieve pressure on your joints, improve blood circulation and support proper spinal alignment when sleeping on your side.
  • Join a supportive community like Expectful where you can access resources, expert advice, and sleep courses tailored to the needs of pregnant women.
  • Establish a bedtime routine – going to bed around the same time each night helps your body’s natural rhythms stay in sync, ensuring you’re getting more restorative rest and waking up feeling refreshed.

Reviewed by:

Kensey Butkevich

Kensey Butkevich (MS, BCBA)
Kensey is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst with over 12 years of clinical experience. Her experience includes parent coaching, clinic-based services, and school-based consultation. She is also a Pediatric Sleep Consultant and Expectful Wellness Expert.

Written by:

bearaby staff

Bearaby Staff Writers
Bearaby’s staff writers are a dynamic team of word-nerds and napthusiasts, dedicated to writing evidence-based articles on current trends in sleep health, mental health, and sustainability.